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Beccy Tanner image

Beccy Tanner, Speaker

Teaches Kansas history classes at Wichita State University and works as a freelance writer

Dirt, Grit, and Jell-O Salad – How We Survived the Great Depression

Generations after the Great Depression, Kansans still define themselves and rural communities largely in the same terms their grandparents and great-grandparents once used – ‘hard-working, close-knit, loyal and faithful.’ But the dynamics have changed. Fewer Kansans are growing up on farms. More than 70 percent of Kansans now identify themselves as living in urban communities. Today, rural Kansans face new challenges—aging communities and fewer services. This presentation examines historical aspects of Kansas during the 1930s to better understand our rural communities today. Discover what communities did to survive and thrive in times of hardships, what it means to be rural, and how that’s changed over time. Are we still full of the dirt, grit, and Jell-O salad that defined our ancestors?  

Contact Beccy directly about speaking at your event:
btanner11@cox.net  

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How to Bring a Humanities Kansas Speaker to Your Event

  1. Review the Movement of Ideas catalog and select a speaker and topic.
  2. Contact the speaker and confirm time, date, and location.
  3. If interested, you can apply for funding to bring this speaker to your community. Find out how. (Please note: Completed applications, including the DUNS number, must be submitted six weeks before the event date to be considered for funding. Humanities Kansas is not able to fund applications that do not meet this requirement.)
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  5. Tell us how it went. After the event, download and fill out a Speakers Bureau Evaluation and Cost Share Form and email them to Abigail Kaup.
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